Teaching how to write a mystery story

Lesson Directions Part 1: The Mystery Planning Sheet By this time, students have listened to and read many mysteries, so they should be very familiar with the common story elements that appear in the majority of stories that can be categorized as a mystery. Make a list of settings from mysteries that students have read during this mystery unit or prior to the mystery genre study in class. Have students choose a setting from the list or come up with one on their own.

Teaching how to write a mystery story

Find parent volunteers willing to type the final copies of the students' mysteries to cut down on the publishing time in class. If you plan to have your students publish their mystery stories in hardcover blank books, you should order the books prior to starting the mystery unit to ensure you'll have them in time.

Lesson Directions Part 1: The Mystery Planning Sheet By this time, students have listened to and read many mysteries, so they should be very familiar with the common story elements that appear in the majority of stories that can be categorized as a mystery. Make a list of settings from mysteries that students have read during this mystery unit or prior to the mystery genre study in class.

Have students choose a setting from the list or come up with one on their own. Encourage students to personalize their setting by giving it a name if it is a school, a town, a store, etc. Have students record their setting in the "What Is Your Setting? Ask for volunteers to share their setting with the class.

It is often helpful for students who are having hard time coming up with a setting on their own to hear ideas from their peers. Make a list of problems students have come across in mysteries they have read in class or independently. Again, encourage students to think about popular mystery series.

teaching how to write a mystery story

Have students choose a category for the type of problem they will be including in their own story. An event that cannot be explained A secret Something that is lost or missing A crime or prank that has been committed Ask students to describe their problem in detail in the "What Is Your Problem?

Allow volunteers to share their problem with the class. This often sparks ideas for students who are struggling to determine a problem on their own. Have students revisit the problem they will be developing in their story and think about what type of characters could be created that would have something to do with the problem.

For instance, if a student author decides to write a story about stolen money at a school fair, suspects might include the president of the student council who helped plan the fair, the janitor who locked up the money after the fair was over, or the student who kept talking about how he didn't have enough money to buy a present for his teacher for Christmas.

Divide students into groups of three or four. Have each student share the problem they plan to include in their story with the member so their group.

Ask group members help each other brainstorm possible suspects for each student's' problem. I am very careful when creating these groups.

I make sure that students I think might struggle to come up with ideas are grouped with my students who are able to think more deeply about a story and give helpful advice to the struggling writers. After students have met with other students in the class, have them complete the "Who Are Your Suspects?

Remind students that they must include both the name of the suspect and why he or she is suspicious. What would be his or her motive for committing the crime? Make a list of detectives from mysteries that students have read during this mystery unit or prior to the mystery genre study in class.

Have students decide the following things: Will my detective be an adult or a kid? How old is my detective? Will my detective be a boy or a girl? Will my detective have a sidekick or a group of friends who help solve the case?

What name will I give my detective? What will my detective look like? What type of personality will my detective have? Where will my detective live? Once students think about the information listed above, have them fill out the "Who Is Your Detective? Ask for volunteers to share their descriptions of the detectives they plan to create in their stories.

After students have met with other students in the class, have them complete the "What Are the Clues in Your Story?

Everyone Loves a Good Mystery

Remind students that some of the clues can lead the reader off track red herringsbut the author must provide some clues that do help the reader actually solve the crime. Plan a Sequence of Events Using a short mystery that you read aloud to the class in Lesson 1: Ingredients of a Mystery, work as a class to put the main events in the order they occurred in the story in the "Sequence of Events" section of the example Planning Your Mystery Worksheet.

Now ask students to brainstorm the main events that will happen in their own mystery by completing the "Sequence of Events" section on their own Planning Your Mystery Worksheet.Mystery is a very dense genre, with many famous authors, sleuths, side-kicks and styles.

But this is your story. Don't try to follow another's footsteps too closely. STORY WRITING LESSON: MYSTERY WRITING. In this lesson, students will learn what the important components to a mystery story are and apply this information to a . Read a spooky mystery by writer Joan Lowery Nixon.

After reading Nixon's story, students write their own mysteries and can publish them online. A teacher's guide is included. Students identify the characteristics of mystery writing in class discussions, outline a mystery story using a graphic organizer, write and revise a mystery story on their own, and edit each other's work.

HOW TO WRITE A MINI-MYSTERY. a locked room, then have them write a story about the picture. Set out the game of Clue and have small groups write a mini-mystery involving the characters, rooms, and weapons in the game. 8. Share the finished mini-mysteries! Let the students read their stories to the class and have the class draw illustrations.

Sep 11,  · Expert Reviewed. How to Write a Mystery Story. Four Parts: Preparing to Write Developing Your Main Character and Outlining the Story Writing the Story Mystery Story Help Community Q&A A good mystery story will have fascinating characters, exciting suspense, and a puzzle that keeps you turning the pages%().

Challenging Children With Mystery Stories