Deep ecology and shallow ecology

Environmentalism had emerged as a popular grassroots political movement in the s with the publication of Rachel Carson's book Silent Spring. Those already involved in conservation and preservation efforts were now joined by many others concerned about the detrimental environmental effects of modern industrial technology. In his talk, he discussed the longer-range background of the ecology movement and its concern with an ethic respecting nature and the inherent worth of other beings.

Deep ecology and shallow ecology

Those already involved in conservation and preservation efforts were now joined by many others concerned about the detrimental environmental effects of modern industrial technology. In his talk, he discussed the longer-range background of the ecology movement and its concern with an ethic respecting nature and the inherent worth of other beings.

As a mountaineer who had climbed all over the world, Naess had enjoyed the opportunity to observe political and social activism in diverse cultures. Both historically and in the contemporary movement, Naess saw two different forms of environmentalism, not necessarily incompatible with each other.

Deep ecology and shallow ecology

The short-term, shallow approach stops before the ultimate level of fundamental change, often promoting technological fixes e. The long-range deep approach involves redesigning our whole systems based on values and methods that truly preserve the ecological and cultural diversity of natural systems.

The distinguishing and original characteristics of the deep ecology movement were its recognition of the inherent value of all living beings and the use of this view in shaping environmental policies.

Those who work for social changes based on this recognition are motivated by love of nature as well as for humans. Invery few people appreciated that Naess was characterizing an existing grassroots movement, rather than simply stating his personal philosophy.

In order to establish shared objectives, Naess proposed a set of eight principles to characterize the deep ecology movement as part of the general ecology movement. The platform can be endorsed by people from a diversity of religious and philosophical backgrounds as well as differing political affiliations.

Unfortunately, some vociferous environmentalists who claim to support the movement have said and written things that are misanthropic in tone. Supporters of the deep ecology movement are not anti-human, as is sometimes alleged. Gandhian nonviolence is a tenet of deep ecology activism in word and deed.

Supporters of the deep ecology movement deplore anti-human statements and actions. Accepting the Deep Ecology Platform principles entails a commitment to respecting the intrinsic values of richness and diversity.

This, in turn, leads one to critique industrial culture, whose development models construe the Earth only as raw materials to be used to satisfy consumption and production—to meet not only vital needs but inflated desires whose satisfaction requires more and more consumption.

While industrial culture has represented itself as the only acceptable model for development, its monocultures destroy cultural and biological diversity in the name of human convenience and profit.

If we do not accept the industrial development model, what then? We learn from the wisdom of our places and the many beings who inhabit them. At the same time, the ecocentric values implied by the platform lead us to recognize that all human cultures have a mutual interest in seeing Earth and its diversity continue for its own sake and because most of us love it.

We want to flourish and realize ourselves in harmony with other beings and cultures. Is it possible to develop common understandings that enable us to work with civility toward harmony with other creatures and beings? The Deep Ecology Platform principles are a step in this direction. Respect for diversity leads us to recognize the ecological wisdom that grows specific to place and context.

Thus, supporters of the deep ecology movement emphasize place-specific, ecological wisdom, and vernacular technology practices. No one philosophy and technology is applicable to the whole planet.

As Naess has said many times, the more diversity, the better.One he called the “long-range deep ecology movement” and the other, the “shallow ecology movement.” The word “deep” in part referred to the level of questioning of our purposes and values when arguing in environmental conflicts.

Deep ecology is an ecological and environmental philosophy promoting the inherent worth of living beings regardless of their instrumental utility to human needs, plus a radical restructuring of modern human societies in accordance with such ideas..

Deep ecology argues that the natural world is a subtle balance of complex inter-relationships in which the existence of organisms is dependent on.

Blogging about Environmental Studies

Jan 16,  · Deep ecology, which called for population reduction, soft technology and non-interference in the natural world, was eagerly taken up by environmentalists impatient with shallow ecology — another of Mr.

Naess’s coinages — which did not confront technology and economic growth. Deep Ecology is a movement that promotes “ecological wisdom,” which is the understanding of the reason for the Shallow Ecology movement by acknowledging the inherent value of all forms of life.

Deep Ecology practices biospherical egalitarianism “in theory.”.

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May 17,  · One he called the “long-range deep ecology movement” and the other, the “shallow ecology movement.” The word “deep” in part referred to the level of questioning of our purposes and values when arguing in environmental conflicts.

Ecology is a scientific discipline; the study of ecosystems. Deep ecology is an ethical system that takes as its premise that all living things have inherent value.

Foundation For Deep Ecology | The Deep Ecology Movement